Jamie T – The Man’s Machine (Pacemaker) 23/11/09

November 27, 2009 by  

JamieTManMachine

Jamie Treays gives the impression of a man with a lot to prove. After an extended break between the massive ‘Panic Prevention’ and latest album ‘Kings and Queens’, as well as drawn out illness that stopped him performing, his fans have certainly had to show a bit of patience.
Since then, Mr T has kicked things up a notch or two. Following ‘Kings and Queens’ and ‘Chaka Demus’ comes ‘The Man’s Machine’, another slice of ska-tinged wide boy poetry. One thing Jamie does better than anyone else at the moment is to sum up the dichotomy of city life, the frenzied everyday race to nowhere.
Lyrically it’s simple but catchy, “stone, glass, concrete and gravel, underground travel and overcast weather”. It could be stream of conciousness, with Jamie just saying what comes into his head on the way home, but it is familiar and sympathetic.
The rest of the E.P is a platform for Jamie to show that he can do other things. ‘Believing in things that can’t be done’ is more conventional (slightly) ballad that is delicate and soft and quite unexpected. ‘Man not a Monster’ stamps around in a much more familiar and energetic way. Both are pretty successful.
More good things from the modern day Dickensian scamp.
Liam Clune
Jamie Treays gives the impression of a man with a lot to prove. After an extended break between the massive ‘Panic Prevention’ and latest album ‘Kings and Queens’, as well as drawn out illness that stopped him performing, his fans have certainly had to show a bit of patience.
Since then, Mr T has kicked things up a notch or two. Following ‘Kings and Queens’ and ‘Chaka Demus’ comes ‘The Man’s Machine’, another slice of ska-tinged wide boy poetry. One thing Jamie does better than anyone else at the moment is to sum up the dichotomy of city life, the frenzied everyday race to nowhere.
Lyrically it’s simple but catchy, “stone, glass, concrete and gravel, underground travel and overcast weather”. It could be stream of conciousness, with Jamie just saying what comes into his head on the way home, but it is familiar and sympathetic.
The rest of the E.P is a platform for Jamie to show that he can do other things. ‘Believing in things that can’t be done’ is more conventional (slightly) ballad that is delicate and soft and quite unexpected. ‘Man not a Monster’ stamps around in a much more familiar and energetic way. Both are pretty successful.
More good things from the modern day Dickensian scamp.
Liam Clune
[rating:3.5]

Comments